English Monarchs
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Genealogical Tables


House of Stuart
James I & VI
Anne of Denmark
Gunpowder Plot
Arbella Stuart
Henry Frederick,
Prince of Wales

Elizabeth Stuart,
Queen of Bohemia

Charles I
Henrietta Maria
of France

Oliver Cromwell
The Civil War
Rupert of the Rhine
Battle of Worcester
Charles II
Catherine of Braganza
Henry, Duke of
Gloucester

James Scott,
Duke of Monmouth

Great Fire of
London

James II
Mary of Modena
Henrietta Anne Stuart
William & Mary
Queen Anne
James Francis Edward
Louisa Maria Stuart
Charles Edward Stuart
Henry Benedict Stuart
Charlotte Stuart
Jacobite Succession


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English Princes
of Wales

The Honours of Wales

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The Regalia
The Theft Of The Crown Jewels



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The House of Stuart

The Stuarts, that highly romantic but luckless dynasty, suceeded to the English throne on the death of the childless Tudor Queen Elizabeth I in 1603, in the person of James I and VI (1603-1625), son of Mary Queen of Scots and Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, who became the first joint ruler of the kingdoms of both England and Scotland. The spelling of the ancient Scottish dynasty of Stewart was changed by Mary, Queen of Scots, during her long residence in France.

The earliest recorded member of the Scottish House of Stewart was Flaald I, who was of Breton origins and was employed in the serice of the eleventh century Lord of Dol and Combourg. Flaald and his immediate descendants held the hereditary and honorary post of Dapifer, or food bearer in the Lord of Dol's household.

The Stuart claim to England's throne derived from Margaret Tudor, eldest daughter of Henry VII, who married James IV. King of Scots. James I's successor Charles I (1625-49) was executed on the orders of Parliament, when England was declared a republic.

Stuart dynasty

The monarchy was restored in 1660 when his son, the previously exiled Charles II (1660-85), was invited to return. Charles, or the 'Merry Monarch' as he is otherwise known, is famous for his many mistresses and his long liason with the actress Nell Gwyn. On the death of his niece, Queen Anne in 1714 the Stuart dynasty was displaced by its Hanoverian cousins. This section also contains biographies of the Stuart Pretenders including the courageous but highly impulsive Bonnie Prince Charlie.



Monarch   Reign Married
James I & VI b.1566
son of-
Henry Stuart
Lord Darnley
& Mary Queen of
Scots
r.1603-1625
Anne of Denmark
Charles I b.1600
son of-
James I
& Anne of Denmark
r.1625-49
Henrietta Maria of France
Charles II b.1630
son of-
Charles I
&Henrietta Maria
of France
r.1660-1685
Catherine of Braganza
James II & VII b.1633
son of-
Charles I
&Henrietta Maria
of France
r.1685-1701
(1)Anne Hyde
(2)Mary of Modena
William III b.1650
son of-
William II of Orange
&Mary of Gt Britain
r.1688-1702
Mary II
Mary II b.1662
daughter of
James II
& Anne Hyde
r.1688-94
William III
Queen Anne b.1664
daughter of
James II
& Anne Hyde
r.1702-1714
George of Denmark


Arbella Stuart Henry Frederick Stuart
Prince of Wales
Elizabeth Stuart,
Queen of Bohemia
Henrietta Maria
of France
Oliver Cromwell The Civil War Rupert of the Rhine Battle of Worcester
James Scott
Duke of Monmouth
Barbara Palmer Nell Gwynn Louise de Kérouaille
Henry, Duke of
Gloucester
Henrietta Anne Stuart Gunpowder Plot Fire of London
Illegitimate children of Charles II James Francis
Edward Stuart
Louisa Maria Stuart Charles Edward
Stuart
Henry Benedict
Stuart
Charlotte Stuart
Duchess of Albany
Jacobite Succession Tower of London
The Massacre of Glencoe Genealogical Tables