English Monarchs
Scottish Monarchs


Saxon
Viking
Norman
Plantagenet
Lancaster
York
Tudor
Stuart
Hanover
Saxe-Coburg-Gotha
Windsor
Genealogical Tables


Native Princes
Of Wales

English Princes
of Wales

The Honours of Wales

Medieval
Tudor Era
Stuart Era
Recent History


The Regalia
The Theft Of The Crown Jewels



Leeds Castle
Buckingham Palace
Windsor Castle
Holyrood House
Balmoral Castle
Sandringham House
Hampton Court Palace
Osborne House

St. George's Chapel
Westminster Abbey
Henry VII Chapel
Edward the
Confessor's Shrine



Order of the Garter
Order of the Bath


Contact
Links


St. George's Chapel, Windsor


St. George's Chapel, WindsorSt. George's Chapel, one of the most beautiful ecclesiastical buildings in England, is located in the Lower Ward of Windsor Castle, and is the chapel of the Order of the Garter, Britain's highest order of chivalry.

The chapel was founded by King Edward III in 1348, one of two new religious colleges established by the king, the other being St Stephen's at Westminster. The chapel was attached to the Chapel of St Edward the Confessor which had been built by Henry III in the early thirteenth century.

The Chapel was to become the Mother Church of the Order of the Garter. A special service is still held annually in the chapel each June and is attended by the members of the order. The order once held frequent services at the chapel, but the practice was discontinued after 1805.

The ceremony was revived in 1948 by King George VI for the 600th anniversary of the founding of the Order, and has since become an annual event. The Knights of the Order of the Garter gather at the medieval carved wooden stalls in the Quire, with the mantle, helmet, crest and sword of each knight set over the stall, heraldic banners still hang over their individual stalls and about 700 engraved and enamelled brass plates of former knights are attached to the backs of the stalls.

St George's Chapel, WindsorThe Yorkist King Edward IV commenced a redevelopment of St George's Chapel in 1475 and by 1484 the choir had been completed.

Building on the chapel was continued in the reign of his his son-in-law, Henry VII , who completed the nave and the magnificent fan vaulted ceiling. The Chapel of St Edward the Confessor was extended into a huge new Cathedral like chapel. The building was completed by 1528, during the reign of Edward IV's grandson, Henry VIII,

A gothic style structure, the stone roof is a superb piece of workmanship, ellipse shaped and supported by pillars. Every part of tthe ceiling holds a different device, the arms of Edward the Confessor, Edward III, Edward the Black Prince, Henry VI, Edward, Edward IV, Henry VII and Henry VIII, are amongst the many displayed there.

The chapel was a became a popular destination for pilgrims during the late medieval period. It was purported to contain several important relics- the bodies of John Schorne and Henry VI and a fragment of the True Cross held in a reliquary called the Cross of Gneth. These relics were displayed at the east end of the south choir aisle. It is said that the Cross of Gneth was brought back from the Holy Land by a Priest called Neotus, who carried it to Wales. The cross was taken by King Edward I in 1283 after the death in battle of Llywelyn, the last Prince of Wales of the native line. His son, King Edward II kept the relic at the Tower of London but King Edward III presented it to the chapel soon after he had founded the Order of the Garter. The relic disappeared in the sixteenth century.

Edward IV, who died in 1483, was the first monarch to be buried at the chapel. His tomb, situated in the east end of the north aisle, is shared by his wife, Elizabeth Woodville, is covered with touchstone, a beautiful gothic style, steel monument, representing a pair of gates between two towers, is the work of John Tresilian, Master Smith to Edward IV. In the front of the monument is a black marble slab, with brass old-English lettering. In 1484, Richard III moved the body of the murdered King Henry VI from Chertsey Abbey in Surrey to the choir of the chapel. The formidable Henry VIII also lies in St George's Chapel, along with his third and best loved wife, Jane Seymour, who died of childbirth fever on 24th October 1537. The tomb of Henry's brother-in-law, Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk is situated near the south door of the choir, Brandon was the second husband of Mary Tudor, Queen Dowager of France, and the sister of Henry VIII.

Tomb of Henry VIIIDuring the Civil War, Parliamentary forces broke into the chapel and plundered the treasury on 23 October 1642, stealing the costly altar hangings of red velvet and gold and trophies of honour over Edward IV's tomb, were richly ornamented with pearls, rubies, and gold. In 1643 the fifteenth-century chapter house was destroyed, lead was stripped from the chapel roofs, and parts of Henry VIII's unfinished tomb stolen.

St. George's Chapel, WindsorFollowing the execution of King Charles I by Oliver Cromwell at the end of the Civil War in 1649, he was buried in a vault in the centre of the choir, which he shares with Henry VIII, Jane Seymour and a stillborn son of Queen Anne. The tomb is marked with a simple black stone slab in the cenre aisle of the choir.

After the Restoration of the monarchy under Charles II, a programme of repair was undertaken. The reign of Queen Victoria witnessed further changes in the architecture of the chapel. The Lady Chapel, situated at the east end of St George's Chapel, and separated from it by a passage, was originally built by Henry III in the thirteenth century, it was converted into the Albert Memorial Chapel between 1863-73 by George Gilbert Scott.

Constructed to commemorate the life of Victoria's consort, Prince Albert, the ornate chapel features lavish decoration and works in marble, glass mosaic and bronze by Henri de Triqueti, Susan Durant, Alfred Gilbert and Antonio Salviati. In front of the altar, with its elaborate reredos, is the Cenotaph of Prince Albert by Triqueti, with a white marble figure of the prince.

In the middle of the nave is the monument of Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence, the elder son of Edward VII, who died of pneumonia at Sandringham House in Norfolk on 14 January 1892. Near the west door is that of Prince Leopold, Duke of Albany, the youngest son of Queen Victoria. Leopold had haemophilia, he died on 28 March 1884 at the age of 30, from a cerebral haemorrhage, which was caused by a fall.

The east door of the Albert Memorial Chapel, which is covered in ornamental ironwork, is the original door from 1246. To the north of the Albert Chapel are the Dean's Cloisters, built by Edward II, the south wall of which is a fragment of the old chapel of Henry III.

Other monarchs buried in the chapel include George III, William IV, Edward VII and Queen Alexandra, George V and Queen Mary, George VI and Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother. The Hastings Chantry is the burial place of Lord Hastings who was hurriedly executed on a block of wood by order of Richard III in 1483. An elaborate carved memorial to Princess Charlotte, only child of King George IV, who died in childbirth, lies in a side chapel toward the back of the nave.

The battle sword of King Edward III, measuring 6 feet 8 inches long, is displayed in the chapter house chapel. The sword hangs beside a whole length portrait of the King.



The Order of the Garter